Phase II Team

Yanwen Zhang (2014 - Current)
Dr. Yanwen Zhang is a Distinguished R&D Staff member at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with a joint faculty appointment in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee (UT). She received a Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics from Lund University (Sweden) and a Ph.D. in Science from Beijing Normal University (China). Dr. Zhang’s research focuses on a broad range of topics in both theoretical and experimental aspects of the interaction of ions, electrons and photons with materials, and how these interactions can be applied to the analysis and modification of materials, as well as the detection and characterization of charged particles. She is the author or co-author of more than 350 refereed journal articles, book chapters, and conference proceedings, including over 70 as lead author, and she has given over 78 invited presentations. She was the recipient of a 2005 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and a DOE Office of Science Early Career Scientist and Engineer Award in recognition of her seminal contributions to the fields of ion-beam physics and ion-solid interactions in materials. As the Director of an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) on Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE), she is leading the research to develop a fundamental understanding of energy dissipation mechanisms and evolution of defects in structural alloys in high-radiation environments.


Jennifer Bultman (2015 - Current)
Jennifer Bultman received a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from the University of New Mexico. She joined the Materials Science and Technology (MST) Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as an Administrative Assistant in 2015. She is currently the Administrative Manager of the BES-funded Energy Frontier Research Center on Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE). In addition to her work with EDDE, Jennifer also supports MST’s Strategic Partnership Projects and the Alloy Behavior and Design group. Jennifer was the 2018 recipient of the UT-Battelle Mission Support by an Administrative Assistant Award.
Dilpuneet Singh Aidhy (2015 - Current)
Dr. Dilpuneet Singh Aidhy received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Florida in the spring of 2009. He was a postdoc at Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory between 2009–2011 before joining IBM as a staff scientist. He later joined Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoc in October 2012. Since August 2015, he has been working as a tenure-track Assistant Professor at the University of Wyoming, Laramie, in the mechanical department. His work focuses on computational microstructure science using atomistic and electronic modeling of point defects, grain boundaries and heterointerfaces in oxide and metallic materials. His primary interests are in oxygen transport in fuel cells, interfacial chemistry, materials design, and radiation effects in materials.
Gaurav Arora (2017 – Current)
Gaurav Arora joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming (UW) as a Master’s degree student in January 2016; he received his Bachelor’s degree from the Punjabi University, Patiala (India). He completed his Master’s in December 2017 and joined UW as a Ph.D. student in January 2018. His research interests lie in the radiation effects on materials, with the main focus on studying defect behavior in concentrated and high entropy alloys using computational tools such as density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamics (MD) and atomistic simulations.
Magdalena Caro (2015 - 2018)
Dr. Magdalena Caro is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VT). She received her Ph.D. from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) Lausanne in 1983. Her career spans 30 years of work on nuclear technology in three countries – Switzerland, Argentina, and the United States, with focus on neutronics, materials, safety, design, and monitoring, both in theoretical and hands-on experimental activities, from zero power test reactors to commercial power plants. Within the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, she investigated energy transport and dissipation mechanisms and explored ionization effects using a non-adiabatic time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) framework, which allows a quantitative determination of the ionization strength for different projectile-target combinations at a level of detail never achieved before. Her work contributed to the detailed understanding of damage processes from electronic excitations induced by swift heavy ions in concentrated solid solution alloys of interest to EDDE.
Takeshi Egami (2018 - Current)
Dr. Takeshi Egami is a Distinguished Scientist in the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Professor at the University of Tennessee (UT) Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy. He served as Director of the UT-ORNL Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences from 2008-2015. As a Senior Principal Investigator with the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, Dr. Egami studies the atomic structure of the damaged layer by X-ray anisotropic pair distribution function analysis and neutron scattering techniques, as well as participates in the study of the electronic structure of the defects in Concentrated Solid-solution Alloys from first-principles calculations.
Zhe Fan (2017 - Current)
Dr. Zhe Fan joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoctoral research associate in October 2017, after he received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University. As a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, his current research focuses on irradiation-induced microstructure evolution of single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys, including high entropy alloys. He characterizes the microstructure change using transmission electron microscopy and performs ion irradiation and ion beam analysis to study defect production and evolution.
Chenyang Lu (2014 – Current)
Dr. Chenyang Lu received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Northeastern University (China) in 2014. His Ph.D. thesis focused on the microstructure and irradiation effects of oxide dispersion strengthened steels. He joined the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences at the University of Michigan (UM) as a visiting student from 2012 to 2014. After receiving his Ph.D. he returned to UM as a postdoctoral research fellow working under the advice of Prof. Lumin Wang and is currently an assistant research scientist. Dr. Lu is a member of the BES-funded Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center. As a researcher in Thrust 2, his work is mainly focused on the microstructural characterization (transmission electron microscopy) of irradiated alloys, and understanding defect distribution and evolution to explore the intrinsic mechanisms of irradiation effects in Ni-based concentrated solid-solution alloys.
Karren More (2017 – Current)
Dr. Karren More is the Group Leader for the Electron and Atom Probe Microscopy Group in the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). She received her Ph.D. from North Carolina State University and has been a research staff member at ORNL since 1988, first in the Materials Science and Technology Division, and more recently (since 2013) at CNMS. Her research interests are focused on using advanced electron microscopy towards understanding the structure and chemistry of nanomaterials, especially related performance, stability, and durability. As the Thrust 2 lead of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, Dr. More’s research focus within EDDE is on the microstructure study in irradiated alloys.
Sai Mu (2015 – 2018)
Dr. Sai Mu joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoc research associate in October 2015; he received his Ph.D. in the area of condensed matter physics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in December 2014. As a member of Thrust 1 of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, he was involved in the ab initio studies of the electric transport and thermal transport in EDDE alloys. His major role included the ab initio study of the effect of chemical disorder, magnetism, and displacement fluctuation on the electric resistivity of the EDDE alloys. In addition, lattice thermal conductivity, due to el-ph coupling, chemical disorder, and other effects, was investigated.
Yury Osetskiy (2016 – Current)
Dr. Yury Osetskiy is a Senior Research and Development Staff Member in the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. His research focus is in the areas of theory and modeling of radiation effects, mechanical properties, phase stability and mass transport. He received his Ph.D. in Physics and Math from the Atomic Energy Institute, Moscow, Russia. As an Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center Principal Investigator, Dr. Osetskiy develops multiscale theoretical and computational approaches/models to predict fundamental properties of Concentrated Solid-solution Alloys, including atomic transport, defect evolution, and radiation damage.
German Samolyuk (2014 – Current)
Physics Institute (Russia) in 1986, and a Ph.D. degree from Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy (Russia) in 1991. His areas of expertise include the first principles calculation of electronic structure of large systems in application to alloys properties and properties of individual and extended defects, development of interatomic potential for needs of molecular dynamic (MD) calculation, modeling of various processes in the materials such as heat transfer, and radiation damage produced by cascades.
G. Malcolm Stocks (2014 – 2018)
Dr. G. Malcolm Stocks was appointed an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Corporate Fellow in 1995. He holds a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Sheffield, United Kingdom. His major research activities are in development and application of first principles electronic structure methods (particularly those based on multiple scattering Green's function methods), the theory of magnetism, alloy theory, semiconductor-oxide interfaces, and the application of parallel algorithms and computers to extend the size and complexity of systems amenable to treatment by first principles methods. As an Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center Senior Principal Investigator, he provided leadership in developing the ab initio and electronic structure theory to understand the effects of extreme chemical complexity on energy dissipation through the electronic, magnetic, and vibrational subsystems, as well as the energetics of defect production and migration in Concentrated Solid-solution Alloys.
Yang Tong (2017 – Current)
Dr. Yang Tong joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoctoral research associate in March 2017. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville in May 2015. He also spent one and a half years as a research fellow at City University of Hong Kong. He is a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center. His work is supervised by Fuxiang Zhang. His research is focused on the evolution of local structure and chemical short-range order under irradiation in concentrated solid-solution alloys using synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction.
Gihan Velisa (2015 – 2018)
Dr. Gihan Velisa joined the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in November 2015. Dr. Velisa held a previous postdoctoral position with French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) examining ion irradiation effects on nano structured multilayered systems, and the nano precipitate development of SiC in dual C and Si beam implanted Si. His undergraduate and graduate studies were at the University of Bucharest, Romania. As part of his education and postgraduate work, he performed materials characterization through numerous techniques such as RBS, TEM, XRD and RAMAN. As a Postdoctoral Research Associate in EDDE Thrust 2, he used ion irradiation and ion beam analysis to study defect production and evolution of ion irradiated Ni and Ni-based alloys single crystals. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling conditions was the main analysis technique for this work.
Lumin Wang (2014 – Current)
Prof. Lumin Wang received his Ph.D. in Materials Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1988 with a thesis topic on radiation effects in binary alloys. He worked at Argonne National Laboratory as a post-doctoral fellow and the University of New Mexico as a research scientist before joining the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1997. He is now a professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences with a joint appointment in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. His research has been focused on ion irradiation effects in metals and ceramic materials and he has published more than 400 journal papers in the area. As a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, he primarily investigates the mechanisms of the combined effects of chemical complexity and preexisting sinks/traps on defect evolution through detailed characterization of defect configuration and distribution in irradiated Concentrated Solid-solution Alloys.
Xing Wang (2017 – Current)
Dr. Xing Wang joined the Center for Nanophase Materials Science Center of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoctoral research associate in March 2017. He received his Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2016. His thesis work focused on investigating the radiation effects on material interfaces using both atomistic simulation and electron microscopy. As a member of the Center on Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE), his current research applies microstructure characterization techniques, including scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography, to understand the effects of material chemistry on the defect evolution process in single phase-concentrated solid solution alloys (SP-CSAs).
William J Weber (2014 – Current)
Prof. William J. Weber joined the faculty in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee (UT) in May 2010 as the Governor’s Chair Professor for Radiation Effects on Materials, with a joint appointment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). His research encompasses experimental and theoretical aspects of the interaction of radiation and charged-particles with solids, irradiation effects in solids, ion-beam modification of materials, defects and defect/property relationships in ceramics, and performance of nuclear materials. As a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, he supervises post-doctoral fellows performing atomistic simulations on: (1) the effects of energy transfer between electrons and atoms on cascade evolution and single ion events in Thrust 1; and (2) defect and microstructure evolution due to point defects and cascade overlap in Thrust 2. As director of the UT-ORNL Ion Beam Materials Laboratory, he provides guidance on many of the irradiation studies performed using this facility. He interacts with experimental and computational researchers across EDDE, as well as with international collaborators, particularly in the areas of swift heavy ion irradiations and two-temperature modeling of energy transfer between electrons and atoms.
Tai-Ni Yang (2014 – Current)
Tai-Ni Yang's research interest lies in the radiation effects on materials. The main participation in the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) project is analyzing irradiated defect structures, including the transmission electron microscope (TEM) sample preparation, imaging and defects structural and migration analysis. The other participating project is testing the 316 SS in the simulated power system to study the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking effects and mechanisms using a proton source. The Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the TEM are frequently used to study the crystallography of materials and irradiation damage in both of the projects.
Eva Zarkadoula (2015 – Current)
Dr. Eva Zarkadoula joined the Materials Theory Group in the Materials Science and Technology Division (MSTD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a staff member in December 2016. Prior to this, she was a postdoctoral researcher in MSTD’s Nuclear Materials Science and Technology Group. Eva received her Ph.D. in Physics from Queen Mary University of London (England) and a B.Sc. in Physics from the University of Athens (Greece). The main focus of her work is the interaction of radiation with matter and the effects of electronic excitations in radiation damage processes, which she investigates using modeling techniques.
Fuxiang Zhang (2015 – Current)
Dr. Fuxiang Zhang joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a research staff scientist in December 2015. He received his Ph.D. from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (China). He is currently a team member for the BES-funded Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center at ORNL. He is the author or co-author of more than 100 peer-reviewed publications on materials synthesis, phase transition, and defects and their effects on phase stabilities at extreme conditions. As an EDDE Principal Investigator, he will use X-ray (lab and synchrotron) and neutron techniques (pair-distribution analysis, diffuse x-ray/neutron scattering, etc.) to detect radiation-induced defect formation and evolution in alloys.
Yufan Zhou (2018 – Current)
Dr. Yufan Zhou joined the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in November 2018. He received his Ph.D. from Shandong University in China. At that time, his research focused on waveguide formation utilizing ion beam technology and optical property modification via ion irradiation. As part of his Ph.D. work, he has performed materials characterization through numerous techniques, such as SIMS, SEM, and RAMAN. As a Postdoctoral Research Associate in EDDE Thrust 2, he will study defect formation and evolution in irradiated Ni and Ni-based alloys using ion beam irradiation and ion beam analysis methods.