Phase I Team

Yanwen Zhang (2014 – Current)
Dr. Yanwen Zhang is a Distinguished R&D Staff member at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with a joint faculty appointment in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee (UT). She received a Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics from Lund University (Sweden) and a Ph.D. in Science from Beijing Normal University (China). Dr. Zhang’s research focuses on a broad range of topics in both theoretical and experimental aspects of the interaction of ions, electrons and photons with materials, and how these interactions can be applied to the analysis and modification of materials, as well as the detection and characterization of charged particles. She is the author or co-author of more than 350 refereed journal articles, book chapters, and conference proceedings, including over 70 as lead author, and she has given over 78 invited presentations. She was the recipient of a 2005 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and a DOE Office of Science Early Career Scientist and Engineer Award in recognition of her seminal contributions to the fields of ion-beam physics and ion-solid interactions in materials. As the Director of an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) on Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE), she is leading the research to develop a fundamental understanding of energy dissipation mechanisms and evolution of defects in structural alloys in high-radiation environments.


Jennifer Bultman (2015 – Current)
Jennifer Bultman received a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from the University of New Mexico. She joined the Materials Science and Technology (MST) Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as an Administrative Assistant in 2015. She is currently the Administrative Manager of the BES-funded Energy Frontier Research Center on Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE). In addition to her work with EDDE, Jennifer also supports MST’s Strategic Partnership Projects and the Alloy Behavior and Design group. Jennifer was the 2018 recipient of the UT-Battelle Mission Support by an Administrative Assistant Award.
Dilpuneet Singh Aidhy (2015 - Current)
Dr. Dilpuneet Singh Aidhy received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Florida in the spring of 2009. He was a postdoc at Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory between 2009–2011 before joining IBM as a staff scientist. He later joined Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoc in October 2012. Since August 2015, he has been working as a tenure-track Assistant Professor at the University of Wyoming, Laramie, in the mechanical department. His work focuses on computational microstructure science using atomistic and electronic modeling of point defects, grain boundaries and heterointerfaces in oxide and metallic materials. His primary interests are in oxygen transport in fuel cells, interfacial chemistry, materials design, and radiation effects in materials.
Gaurav Arora (2017 – Current)
Gaurav Arora joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming (UW) as a Master’s degree student in January 2016; he received his Bachelor’s degree from the Punjabi University, Patiala (India). He completed his Master’s in December 2017 and joined UW as a Ph.D. student in January 2018. His research interests lie in the radiation effects on materials, with the main focus on studying defect behavior in concentrated and high entropy alloys using computational tools such as density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamics (MD) and atomistic simulations.
Hongbin Bei (2014 – 2018)
Dr. Hongbin Bei joined Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2008. He received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Tennessee. Dr. Bei's research focused on alloy design, materials synthesis, microstructure control and mechanical behavior across multiple length scales (from nano to macro) of various structural materials, including advanced steels, superalloys, bulk metallic glasses, intermetallic compounds and the recently developed high entropy alloys. As a senior investigator in the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, Dr. Bei participated in both Thrusts 1 and 2. His main research efforts involved materials selection, synthesis and single crystal growth, investigation of defect formation and the interactions of materials in irradiation environments. His materials and experimental data were used to validate theoretical models of energy dissipation processes under various irradiation conditions.
Laurent Beland (2014 - 2016)
Dr. Laurent Beland joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a postdoctoral role in February 2014; he received his Ph.D. in physics from the Université de Montréal, Canada in 2014. He was involved in the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center at ORNL, mostly working under the advice of Dr. Roger E. Stoller. As a researcher in EDDE Thrust 2, he applied atomistic simulations (molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo) to understand how alloying affects radiation-induced defect formation and defect stability, leading to changes in defect accumulation. He collaborated with EDDE computational researchers on Thrust 1 and Thrust 2 to assess interatomic potentials and develop necessary modifications to those potentials, and interacted with EDDE experimentalists to compare simulation results to ion channeling, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray scattering data in order to understand relevant damage mechanisms. He authored and co-authored 14 peer-reviewed manuscripts within EDDE. Following a subsequent postdoctoral appointment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he now holds a tenure-track faculty position at Queen's University, Ontario, Canada.
Alfredo Caro (2014 – 2015)
Dr. Alfredo Caro graduated from Instituto Balseiro in Argentina in 1976 and received his Ph.D. from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne in 1981. Dr. Caro is a well-respected physicist who has worked as the Director of the Atomic Center in Bariloche, Argentina and as the Director of Institute Balseiro for the European Fusion Program at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. Most recently, Dr. Caro has worked at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, as well as at the National Science Foundation as Program Director in the Division of Materials Research. At present, he is a research Professor at George Washington University. His scientific work focuses on nuclear materials.
Magdalena Caro (2015 – 2018)
Dr. Magdalena Caro is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VT). She received her Ph.D. from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) Lausanne in 1983. Her career spans 30 years of work on nuclear technology in three countries – Switzerland, Argentina, and the United States, with focus on neutronics, materials, safety, design, and monitoring, both in theoretical and hands-on experimental activities, from zero power test reactors to commercial power plants. Within the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, she investigated energy transport and dissipation mechanisms and explored ionization effects using a non-adiabatic time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) framework, which allowed a quantitative determination of the ionization strength for different projectile-target combinations at a level of detail never achieved before. Her work contributed to the detailed understanding of damage processes from electronic excitations induced by swift heavy ions in concentrated solid solution alloys of interest to EDDE.
Debajit Chakraborty (2016 - 2017)
Dr. Debajit Chakraborty received his Ph.D. in Computational and Theoretical Chemistry from the Department of Chemistry and Biology at the McMaster University, Canada in the summer of 2012. He was a postdoc at the Quantum Theory Project (QTP), Department of Physics, University of Florida between 2012–2016, working on kinetic energy functional development for orbital-free density functional theory (OFDFT). He later joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering at University of Wyoming, Laramie as a post-doctoral scholar under the supervision of Dr. Dilpuneet S. Aidhy in July 2016. As a team member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, his work focused on the understanding of point defects using atomistic and electronic modeling in Ni-based single phased concentrated solid solution due to irradiation. He joined the Physics Department at Wake Forest University as a post-doctoral scholar in November 2017 to develop van-der-Waals functional under density functional framework. His primary interests are material design, radiation effects in materials, and method development and its implementation for first-principle calculations.
Alfredo A. Correa (2015 – 2018)
Dr. Alfredo Correa joined the Physics Division of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as a Lawrence Fellow in 2008 after he received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California at Berkeley. He is currently an LLNL Staff Member, and a PI for Laboratory Directed Research and Development on numerical methods for the simulation of electron dynamics. He received the Physical Data Research Program, Physics and Advanced Technologies Award at LLNL in 2007. As a PI in the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center in Thrust 1, he applied atomistic simulations of combined electron and molecular dynamics to understand how ion radiation transfers energy and momentum to the material, and how, later, the heat is dissipated in the electronic and ionic degrees of freedom. As the leader of Thrust 1, he coordinated with EDDE computational and experimental researchers in Thrust 1 and Thrust 2. The goal was to understand the validity of two-temperature models, determination of electron-phonon coupling and the inclusion of dissipative ionic forces due to electronic excitations in large scale molecular dynamics and its ultimate consequences to the production of damage.
Zhe Fan (2017 – Current)
Dr. Zhe Fan joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoctoral research associate in October 2017, after he received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University. As a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, his current research focuses on irradiation-induced microstructure evolution of single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys, including high entropy alloys. He characterizes the microstructure change using transmission electron microscopy and performs ion irradiation and ion beam analysis to study defect production and evolution.
Mo-Rigen He (2014 – 2018)
Dr. Mo-Rigen He received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Tsinghua University (China) in June 2011 and is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison. His current research focuses on the characterization of irradiation damage and defect evolution in Ni-based multi-principal-element alloys using in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy. His interests include irradiation-induced degradation of stainless steels, mechanical properties of nanostructured materials, and advanced electron microscopy.
Ke Jin (2015 – 2018)
Dr. Ke Jin received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Tennessee in May 2015. His thesis research focused on the radiation effects and ion beam analysis of materials. Dr. Jin was a postdoctoral research associate in the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and he was a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, advised by Dr. Hongbin Bei. His research interests include the irradiation-induced defect evolution in metallic alloys, development of novel Ni-based concentrated solid-solution alloys, and the characterization of their unique physical and mechanical properties.
Aleksi Leino (2016 - 2017)
Dr. Aleksi A. M. Leino joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a postdoctoral research associate in January 2016; he received his Ph.D. from the University of Helsinki, Finland, in autumn 2015. His thesis was focused on swift heavy ion induced effects in silicon dioxide. He also holds a B. Sc and M. Sc. degree in physics from the University of Helsinki. He was a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center at ORNL, and worked under the supervision of Dr. Yanwen Zhang and Professor William J. Weber. As a researcher in EDDE Thrust 1, he used atomistic simulations (two-temperature molecular dynamics) to study energy dissipation under extreme electronic excitations induced by swift heavy ions.
Chenyang Lu (2014 – Current)
Dr. Chenyang Lu received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Northeastern University (China) in 2014. His Ph.D. thesis focused on the microstructure and irradiation effects of oxide dispersion strengthened steels. He joined the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences at the University of Michigan (UM) as a visiting student from 2012 to 2014. After receiving his Ph.D. he returned to UM as a postdoctoral research fellow working under the advice of Prof. Lumin Wang and is currently an assistant research scientist. Dr. Lu is a member of the BES-funded Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center. As a researcher in Thrust 2, his work is mainly focused on the microstructural characterization (transmission electron microscopy) of irradiated alloys, and understanding defect distribution and evolution to explore the intrinsic mechanisms of irradiation effects in Ni-based concentrated solid-solution alloys.
Karren More (2017 – Current)
Dr. Karren More is the Group Leader for the Electron and Atom Probe Microscopy Group in the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). She received her Ph.D. from North Carolina State University and has been a research staff member at ORNL since 1988, first in the Materials Science and Technology Division, and more recently (since 2013) at CNMS. Her research interests are focused on using advanced electron microscopy towards understanding the structure and chemistry of nanomaterials, especially related performance, stability, and durability. As the Thrust 2 lead of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, Dr. More’s research focus within EDDE is on the microstructure study in irradiated alloys.
Sai Mu (2015 – 2018)
Dr. Sai Mu joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoc research associate in October 2015; he received his Ph.D. in the area of condensed matter physics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in December 2014. As a member of Thrust 1 of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, he was involved in the ab initio studies of the electric transport and thermal transport in EDDE alloys. His major role included the ab initio study of the effect of chemical disorder, magnetism, and displacement fluctuation on the electric resistivity of the EDDE alloys. In addition, lattice thermal conductivity, due to el-ph coupling, chemical disorder, and other effects, was investigated.
Raina Olsen (2014 – 2016)
Dr. Raina J. Olsen received her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Missouri in 2011. She received a competitive postdoctoral award from the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, to study quantum excitations in adsorbed films using neutron scattering. She joined the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2014. She is the author or co-author of 15 peer-reviewed publications. Her work for EDDE focused on the use of neutron and X-ray scattering techniques to examine the structure and dynamics of crystal lattices in disordered alloys. She also used her experience in many-body quantum theory, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo to bridge between theory and experiment, performing measurements probing the boundaries of the current understanding of lattice energy dissipation in disordered systems.
Yury Osetskiy (2016 – Current)
Dr. Yury Osetskiy is a Senior Research and Development Staff Member in the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. His research focus is in the areas of theory and modeling of radiation effects, mechanical properties, phase stability and mass transport. He received his Ph.D. in Physics and Math from the Atomic Energy Institute, Moscow, Russia. As an Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center Principal Investigator, Dr. Osetskiy develops multiscale theoretical and computational approaches/models to predict fundamental properties of Concentrated Solid-solution Alloys, including atomic transport, defect evolution, and radiation damage.
Ian M. Robertson (2014 – 2018)
Prof. Ian M. Robertson joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2013 as the Dean of the College of Engineering and a professor in Materials Science and Engineering as well as Engineering Physics. He was a Senior Principal Investigator in the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. His insight into the mechanisms responsible for hydrogen embrittlement of metals was recognized by the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1984 when he received the Outstanding Scientific Accomplishment in Metallurgy and Ceramics prize. In 2011, he received the DOE EE Fuel Cell Program award for contributions to our understanding of mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement. He was selected as the 2014 recipient of the ASM Edward DeMille Campbell Memorial Lectureship. He has been recognized as a Fellow of the ASM International, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society. As a member of EDDE he used in-situ transmission electron microscope electron and ion irradiations to understand how alloying influences the evolution of radiation damage. He interacted with the simulation effort in EDDE Thrust 2 to understand the differences in the responses of alloys.
Ritesh Sachan (2014 – 2016)
German Samolyuk (2014 – Current)
Physics Institute (Russia) in 1986, and a Ph.D. degree from Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy (Russia) in 1991. His areas of expertise include the first principles calculation of electronic structure of large systems in application to alloys properties and properties of individual and extended defects, development of interatomic potential for needs of molecular dynamic (MD) calculation, modeling of various processes in the materials such as heat transfer, and radiation damage produced by cascades.
Neila Sellami (2015 - 2017)
Dr. Neila Sellami received her B.Sc. degree in Industrial Chemistry from the Institut National des Sciences Appliquées et de Technologie (INSAT, Tunisia), an M.Sc. degree in Materials for Structure and Energy from the University of Paris Sud (France), an M.Sc. in Functional Polymers from the University of Paris-Est Créteil (France), and in 2015 received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Paris Sud (France). The main focus of her Ph.D. thesis was the study of radiation effects in pyrochlore oxides under a broad range of energy. Dr. Sellami joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in August 2015. As a researcher in the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, she used X-Ray diffraction to examine ion-induced defect production and evolution to ultimately understand the effects of electronic energy deposition and dissipation on damage evolution in Ni and Ni-based concentrated crystalline alloys.
Shi Shi (2015 – 2018)
Dr. Shi Shi joined the Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, as a post-doctoral fellow in April 2015; she received her Ph.D. from Hokkaido University (Japan). As a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, she was responsible for determining the dependence of dislocation loop production rates on irradiation parameters such as electron energy, ion mass, energy, dose and temperature for the alloys under consideration. The studies were conducted both in-situ in the transmission electron microscope and by post-irradiation characterization using various electron microscopy techniques. A novel aspect of this effort was the development of electron tomography to determine the spatial distribution of irradiation-produced defects, especially in in-situ irradiations of electron transparent foils, and as a means to distinguish between interstitial and vacancy loops.
Elliot Specht (2014 – 2015)
G. Malcolm Stocks (2014 – 2018)
Dr. G. Malcolm Stocks was appointed an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Corporate Fellow in 1995. He holds a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Sheffield, United Kingdom. His major research activities are in development and application of first principles electronic structure methods (particularly those based on multiple scattering Green's function methods), the theory of magnetism, alloy theory, semiconductor-oxide interfaces, and the application of parallel algorithms and computers to extend the size and complexity of systems amenable to treatment by first principles methods. As an Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center Senior Principal Investigator, he provided leadership in developing the ab initio and electronic structure theory to understand the effects of extreme chemical complexity on energy dissipation through the electronic, magnetic, and vibrational subsystems, as well as the energetics of defect production and migration in Concentrated Solid-solution Alloys.
Roger Stoller (2014 – 2016)
Dr. Roger Stoller joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a research staff member in April 1984; he received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He was a Distinguished Research Staff Member, and was a Co-PI of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center at ORNL. From 2012 through 2015 he served as an Editor of the Journal of Nuclear Materials. He has been recognized as a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society, ASM International and ASTM International. In EDDE Thrust 2, he applied atomistic simulations (molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo) to understand how alloying affects radiation-induced defect formation and defect stability, leading to changes in defect accumulation. He collaborated with EDDE computational researchers on Thrust 1 and Thrust 2 to assess interatomic potentials and develop necessary modifications to those potentials, and interacted with EDDE experimentalists to compare simulation results to ion channeling, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray scattering data in order to understand relevant damage mechanisms.
Artur Tamm (2014 – 2018)
Dr. Artur Tamm is a postdoc in the Physics Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His main research focus has been related to atomistic simulations using empirical potential based molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT), and the development of empirical potentials based on DFT forces and energies. Previously, he studied diffusion of Xe atoms on the surface of amourphous material and vacancy energetics at the interface of nanoscale metallic multilayered composites. Also, Dr. Tamm has worked in the RADInterfaces European Union, 7th Framework Programme representing the University of Tartu (Estonia). Finally, his previous work also includes measurements of quenching rates of short-pulse laser excited gases.
Yang Tong (2017 – Current)
Dr. Yang Tong joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoctoral research associate in March 2017. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville in May 2015. He also spent one and a half years as a research fellow at City University of Hong Kong. He is a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center. His work is supervised by Fuxiang Zhang. His research is focused on the evolution of local structure and chemical short-range order under irradiation in concentrated solid-solution alloys using synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction.
Mohammad Ullah (2015 - 2017)
Dr. Mohammad W. Ullah joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a postdoctoral research associate in April 2015; he received his Ph.D. from the University of Helsinki, Finland. His thesis was focused on understanding the effect of single and molecular ion irradiation on defect formation and optical properties of bulk and nanostructured GaN. He holds a M. Sc. degree from the Materials Science and Engineering Department in Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. Mohammad was a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center at ORNL, and worked under the supervision of Professor William J. Weber. As a researcher in EDDE Thrust 2, he used atomistic simulations (molecular dynamics) to study ion irradiation induced primary damage formation, accumulation and evolution due to cascade overlap.
Gihan Velisa (2015 – 2018)
Dr. Gihan Velisa joined the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in November 2015. Dr. Velisa held a previous postdoctoral position with French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) examining ion irradiation effects on nano structured multilayered systems, and the nano precipitate development of SiC in dual C and Si beam implanted Si. His undergraduate and graduate studies were at the University of Bucharest, Romania. As part of his education and postgraduate work, he performed materials characterization through numerous techniques such as RBS, TEM, XRD and RAMAN. As a Postdoctoral Research Associate in EDDE Thrust 2, he used ion irradiation and ion beam analysis to study defect production and evolution of ion irradiated Ni and Ni-based alloys single crystals. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling conditions was the main analysis technique for this work.
Lumin Wang (2014 – Current)
Prof. Lumin Wang received his Ph.D. in Materials Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1988 with a thesis topic on radiation effects in binary alloys. He worked at Argonne National Laboratory as a post-doctoral fellow and the University of New Mexico as a research scientist before joining the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1997. He is now a professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences with a joint appointment in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. His research has been focused on ion irradiation effects in metals and ceramic materials and he has published more than 400 journal papers in the area. As a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, he primarily investigates the mechanisms of the combined effects of chemical complexity and preexisting sinks/traps on defect evolution through detailed characterization of defect configuration and distribution in irradiated Concentrated Solid-solution Alloys.
Xing Wang (2017 – Current)
Dr. Xing Wang joined the Center for Nanophase Materials Science Center of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoctoral research associate in March 2017. He received his Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2016. His thesis work focused on investigating the radiation effects on material interfaces using both atomistic simulation and electron microscopy. As a member of the Center on Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE), his current research applies microstructure characterization techniques, including scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography, to understand the effects of material chemistry on the defect evolution process in single phase-concentrated solid solution alloys (SP-CSAs).
William J Weber (2014 – Current)
Prof. William J. Weber joined the faculty in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee (UT) in May 2010 as the Governor’s Chair Professor for Radiation Effects on Materials, with a joint appointment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). His research encompasses experimental and theoretical aspects of the interaction of radiation and charged-particles with solids, irradiation effects in solids, ion-beam modification of materials, defects and defect/property relationships in ceramics, and performance of nuclear materials. As a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, he supervises post-doctoral fellows performing atomistic simulations on: (1) the effects of energy transfer between electrons and atoms on cascade evolution and single ion events in Thrust 1; and (2) defect and microstructure evolution due to point defects and cascade overlap in Thrust 2. As director of the UT-ORNL Ion Beam Materials Laboratory, he provides guidance on many of the irradiation studies performed using this facility. He interacts with experimental and computational researchers across EDDE, as well as with international collaborators, particularly in the areas of swift heavy ion irradiations and two-temperature modeling of energy transfer between electrons and atoms.
Tai-Ni Yang (2014 – Current)
Tai-Ni Yang's research interest lies in the radiation effects on materials. The main participation in the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) project is analyzing irradiated defect structures, including the transmission electron microscope (TEM) sample preparation, imaging and defects structural and migration analysis. The other participating project is testing the 316 SS in the simulated power system to study the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking effects and mechanisms using a proton source. The Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the TEM are frequently used to study the crystallography of materials and irradiation damage in both of the projects.
Eva Zarkadoula (2015 – Current)
Dr. Eva Zarkadoula joined the Materials Theory Group in the Materials Science and Technology Division (MSTD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a staff member in December 2016. Prior to this, she was a postdoctoral researcher in MSTD’s Nuclear Materials Science and Technology Group. Eva received her Ph.D. in Physics from Queen Mary University of London (England) and a B.Sc. in Physics from the University of Athens (Greece). The main focus of her work is the interaction of radiation with matter and the effects of electronic excitations in radiation damage processes, which she investigates using modeling techniques.
Fuxiang Zhang (2015 – Current)
Dr. Fuxiang Zhang joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a research staff scientist in December 2015. He received his Ph.D. from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (China). He is currently a team member for the BES-funded Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center at ORNL. He is the author or co-author of more than 100 peer-reviewed publications on materials synthesis, phase transition, and defects and their effects on phase stabilities at extreme conditions. As an EDDE Principal Investigator, he will use X-ray (lab and synchrotron) and neutron techniques (pair-distribution analysis, diffuse x-ray/neutron scattering, etc.) to detect radiation-induced defect formation and evolution in alloys.
Shijun Zhao (2015 – 2018)
Dr. Shijun Zhao joined the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a postdoctoral research associate in July 2015. He received his Ph.D. from Peking University (China) in July 2013, where he also spent two years as a postdoc. As a member of the Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution (EDDE) Center, his work was mainly supervised by Malcolm Stocks and Yanwen Zhang. His research primarily focused on the modeling of defect formation and migration in concentrated solid-solution alloys by the ab initio method and classical molecular dynamics simulations.